Definitions of "Non-Produced"

Submission
Best Practices

DG Definitions for Submissions
 

Published Work

 

  • A dramatic work (play, lyric, libretto, or musical composition) that has been

    • Fixed in a tangible medium (including digital formats)

    • Reasonably capable of being copied and/or distributed

    • Either commercially distributed by a third-party publisher 

    • Self-published with at least 1000 copies sold via commercial distribution

 

Unproduced Script/Non-Professional Production

 

  • A script that has not been “professionally” produced 

  • Definition of a Non-Professional Production

    • Readings, staged readings, AEA workshops, developmental productions, amateur productions, concert versions, etc.

 

Professional Production 

 

  • Fully-staged, royalty-paying, public production

  • Utilizes at least one performer who belongs to a live performing arts union or guild (e.g., AEA, AGMA, AGVA), employed under such performer’s union or guild contract

 

Premiere 

 

  • The first royalty-paying professional production in a territory

  • Presented for no less than twelve performances

  • An official press opening

  • Tickets sold to the general public, including subscribers

O'Neill Definition for Submissions
 

A professional production means:

  • The artists working on the show were compensated for their time
     

  • All of the theatrical elements that one hopes to see — light, set, sound, costume, etc. — were present. 
     

  • If your piece has had a reading or a workshop, or if scripts were still in your actors’ hands at the time of a performance, we would not consider that a “professional production.”
     

  • If your piece was produced but the production lacked significant and necessary theatrical elements — a Zoom or virtual reading, stage lighting, projections, or puppets, for instance — we do not consider that a “professional production."
     

  • If your piece has been produced by a college or university theater, we would not consider that a “professional production.”
     

  • If your piece was fully produced but the artists were not compensated, we would not consider that a “professional production.”
     

  • If your piece has been produced, but the production lacked significant and necessary theatrical elements — stage lighting, projections, or puppets, for instance — we would not consider that a “professional production.”
     

"A playwright must be his own audience. A novelist may lose his readers for a few pages; a playwright never dares lose his audience for a minute.
Terrance Rattigan
"Theater is a mirror, a sharp reflection of society. The greatest playwrights are moralists.
Yasmina Reza